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Media headlines

High salaries don't guarantee success, but oversight key

Professor of Finance Stuart Locke said the majority of hospital boards run deficits, making it hard to argue that society is getting value for money.

Locke said the State Services Commission, which approves salaries for district health board CEOs, is competent and sets responsible salaries. "The problem lies in the health boards. The district health boards have elected people on them and they do not seem to be focussed on controlling the finances.

"How can we possibly believe [Murray's spending] was being monitored, and that was a good deal for our community?"

Stuff, 30 Nov, 2017

From cruise ships to doctorate, Ash Puriri changes course

For Ash Puriri, completing his doctorate from the University of Waikato is a far cry from his days as a renowned Barry White impersonator. In his mid-50s, Dr Puriri is a veteran of global cruise ship entertainment, an opera singer and songwriter.

Dr Puriri will graduate on 11 December at Te Kohinga Mārama Marae with a doctorate in Māori indigenous tourism management. His research examined the cultural values and processes that a whānau would encounter and engage in when developing a Māori tourism business.

"Management has long been considered and dominated by a Western methodology, coming from a scientific perspective and using qualitative and quantitative research methods, and now I've introduced a dedicated cultural empirical research methodology, a kaupapa Māori methodology," Dr Puriri said.

NZ Herald, 29 Nov, 2017

Jason Minkhorst to join Ballance Agri-Nutrients

Waikato Management School alumnus Jason Minkhorst (Bachelor of Management Studies, 1989 - 1992) has been confirmed as General Manager Sales for Ballance Agri-Nutrients, with responsibility for Ballance's national sales strategy. He will join the farmer-owned co-operative in March 2018.

Jason is currently Director Farm Source Stores of Fonterra’s rural retail business, Farm Source. He has more than 15 years' extensive commercial experience in senior executive and governance roles in the dairy sector.

Scoop, 27 Nov, 2017

Deloitte Top 200: Young Executive of the Year - Komal Mistry, Fonterra

Waikato Management School BMS(Hons) alumna Komal Mistry has been named Young Executive of the Year at the Deloitte Top 200 awards held last night.

Komal, general manager of Fonterra Ventures, has been a driving force in the company's highly successful 'Disrupt' programme - dedicated to finding innovative new ideas among the dairy giant's 22,000 employees.

"We've taken the model from a mere pilot to global in 12 months," she says. "It's essentially a platform where any of our people can come up with business concepts and we second them into bringing them to life."

NZ Herald, 24 Nov 2017

Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand's 37-year-old leader, rolls up her sleeves

In the latest issue of TIME magazine, Waikato Management School's Professor Debashish Munshi praises the outstanding communication skills of his former student, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern (BCS in Public Relations and Politics, 2001).

At 37, she is the youngest female leader in the world.

“We teach students, but there are some students we learn from as well, and I would say that she was one of those students,” says Professor Munshi. “The simple things like humility, social consciousness—you can see what a great communicator she is.”

Professsor Kay Weaver adds: “We don’t have to use Obama’s speeches anymore in class. We can use Jacinda’s.”

TIME magazine, 20 Nov 2017

Kiwi banks’ low-risk nature avoids scandal

The New Zealand banking system’s inherently risk-averse nature is one of the key reasons why our banks have been devoid of scandal for many years, says Professor of Finance Stuart Locke.

Locke points to New Zealand’s strong record on transparency and corruption as some factors that could account for the squeaky-clean nature of the Kiwi banking sector. He says banks tend to be very conservative lenders to small business borrowers and small borrowers generally. They can do this because they have plenty of business from quality large borrowers.

As a country without a strong base of domestic savings, much of the money lent out by the banks on mortgages is borrowed offshore. The more they borrow, the higher the risk. One way of mitigating overall risk is not to move into risky areas, which appears to be the approach of Kiwi banks.

“But there's a bit of exclusion [of some customer groups]. My feeling is our banking system has left some holes in the more vulnerable areas in the community. If you transfer the risk by not engaging in certain sectors then you don't look as if you're a problem.”

Kiwibank is positioning to step into that area, to provide services to people other banks won't deal with, says Locke.

Finsia, 1 Nov 2017